What the heck is NOODP, you ask? In this article I’m going to show you a little known meta tag, recently introduced by major search engines, that allows you to control exactly what they display in the search results for your website. This can make all the difference between customers clicking on to your website or your competitors. Continue reading »

 

Hot Points – A blog by Go Daddy CEO and founder Bob Parsons
The add/drop scheme. How millions of .COM names are used but never paid for.

Makes for a darn good reading. Mind you, compare ($500K+) with what an average guy is able/willing to invest into making his online living…

 

DoFollow (WP Plugin) – Kimmo Suominen

This is a plugin for WordPress. It will disable the automatic rel=”nofollow” attributes added to external links. You may want to do this if you have good spam filtering for your comments, or if your blog is moderated. Optionally you can also set a comment age limit for adding the attributes.

This seems perfect for awarding people who take time from their busy schedule and write a line or two on your blog. They’ll get back a bit of Page Rank from your blog through the back link, which may be enough motivation for many to start typing. Continue reading »

 

Coming straight from the Google HQ, this is actually a gem about what PageRank really is worth for these days.

Matt Cutts: Gadgets, Google, and SEO » SEO advice: url canonicalization

Normally if you don’t see crawled snippets and only see urls, it usually means that it would help to have more links to your site. More PageRank helps to get more crawling.

Now, this isn’t exactly hot news, as many people knew about – and have actively used – inbound links from high PageRank pages to ensure timely spidering. During my experiments I’ve been able to get brand new websites noticed and indexed by search engines, especially Google and MSN, in 12 hours or less with just two or three inbound links from PR 3 – 5 pages.

But it’s somewhat comforting to know PageRank is still used for something other than a distraction, if you know what I mean :D

 

A few days ago I mentioned what looks like a good way to make lots of money by buying expired domains. Some of them may come with a bit of traffic, a few may even have a good Google PR.

After watching the undergoing auctions at a popular expired domain broker, I can tell you Continue reading »

 

Forget condos and strip malls. Domain names, the real estate of the Web, have been delivering far greater returns. How some of the savviest speculators on the Net are making millions from their URL portfolios?

Read all about it in a very well documented article: Masters of their Domains.

It makes a pretty good reading, so I won’t spoil your pleasure by dissecting it here. Just one key phrase to keep in mind: “type-in”. Or was it cash-in? :P

 

Relevant incoming links are the lifeblood of SEO. Thus it is very important when you do maintenance tasks on your website – such as changing the Permalink structure in your WordPress blog – to make sure old URLs still work.

There are a lot of techniques that help users access old URLs, but only one of them is pretty effective for preserving whatever link gain you’ve accumulated. And that is the use of 301 redirects. This technique can be applied to any kind of website, not just blogs.

To make sure your PR isn’t lost when you restructure old links, stick a 301 redirect from the old URL to the new one. And the easiest way to do that is by using rewrite rules in your .htaccess.

TIP: Since 301 redirects pass the accumulated link gain, think what will happen if you use them for 2 or more old URLs and set the redirect target from all of them to the same destination URL. This technique can be used as a quick and effective way to boost a new page Rank to the sum of the link popularity of all old pages that now redirect to it.

As with any SEO technique, over-doing it can hurt your website. But used responsibly it can provide the extra advantage in front of your competitors.

 

For those of you who don’t know the whole story, Tom read about a flaw in Google’s News service in a blog here.

In a split second, he decides to try a prank on his teenager friends and fakes a press release claiming he was the youngest Google employee, in charge of GMail’s security. Continue reading »

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